JD Roth

Author, blogger and financial expert running Get Rich Slowly

J.D. Roth founded Get Rich Slowly in 2006, published Your Money: The Missing Manual in 2010, created the year-long “Get Rich Slowly” course in 2014, and for four years contributed the monthly “Your Money” column to Entrepreneur magazine.

He started Get Rich Slowly in 2006 to document his personal journey as he dug out of debt. Then he shared while he learned to save and invest. Twelve years later, he managed to reach early retirement! He shares stories about debt elimination, saving money, and practical investing. He scours the web for the latest personal finance tools and articles. He also posts news on related topics like simplicity, frugality, and personal development.

In 2009, for reasons both personal and financial, he sold Get Rich Slowly — but stuck around as manager, editor, and primary writer until 2012. Then he “retired”. (Sort of.) In October 2017, he bought Get Rich Slowly back! You can reach JD on Twitter @jdroth.

watch playing with fire

A documentary about the FIRE movement and one families quest to achieve financial independence and retire early. Available on the following:

Get your copy of the

book

A perfect follow up on the film to dive deeper into the philosophies and "how-tos of the FIRE movement"
Playing the FIRE book image

Reading material

We have assembled the foundational information to get your start on the right foot down the FIRE path to financial independence.

How to Reach Financial Independence

Now that you know what FIRE is and why there is a growing movement of people who are aspiring to reach FIRE — or who have already succeeded — you might start wondering if this is something you could achieve.

Playing with FIRE forward

Playing with FIRE book forward written by Pete Adeney, a.k.a. Mr. Money Mustache

What is the Mega-Backdoor Roth Strategy?

Individuals with high incomes are usually not allowed to use a Roth IRA, but a mega-backdoor Roth conversion strategy is one way for these individuals to contribute up to $39,500 to a Roth IRA, get the tax-free benefits on the growth of these monies, and then withdraw the funds in retirement.